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Pineapple & Mango SAGE Popsicles

Since we’re in the middle of a heat wave AND in the middle of SAGE week, here’s a super simple boozy popsicle recipe to cool you off.

Pineapple & Mango SAGE Popsicles

Makes 6 pops

Ingredients
6 oz. fresh pineapple chunks
6 oz. fresh mango chunks
2 oz. Simple Syrup
2 oz. SAGE liquor

8 oz. Water

 

Directions

– In a blender combine pineapple, mango, simple syrup, SAGE and water. Blend on high until smooth.

– Pour the mixture into popsicle molds and carefully add popsicle sticks. Freeze for 10-12 hours.

ENJOY!


Negroni Week

Traditionally made with equal parts gin, sweet vermouth, and Campari, the Negroni is a classic apéritif cocktail with a perfect blend of bitter, sweet, and citrus flavors. Its simplicity has spawned tons of variations, from the Boulevardier (swap whiskey for gin) to the Hanky-Panky (swap Fernet for Campari). We’ve come up with a few of our own, using Art in the Age’s unique spirits. Check out the recipes below, and celebrate Negroni Week with a twist!

 

Chicory Negroni
1 ½ oz AITA Chicory Root
1 oz Aperol
½ oz Amontillado Sherry
Orange peel garnish

SAGE Negroni
1 oz SAGE
1 oz Campari
1 oz sweet vermouth
2 dashes orange bitters
Orange peel garnish

Negroni Blanc
1 oz SAGE
1 oz Hendricks Gin
1 oz Dolin Blanc
Orange peel garnish

Rhuby Negroni
1 oz RHUBARB tea
1 oz gin
1 oz Aperol
Orange peel garnish


The Aura – Smith & Diction

Welcome to this month’s installment of The Aura. Once a month, we’ll sit down with an artist, maker, or other creative who represents the Art in the Age philosophy.

When we started Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, we were inspired by Walter Benjamin’s 1935 essay of the same name. One of the main theories he presents is that of the aura – a quality that a piece of art has that separates it from something mass-produced. There’s an inherent value in the handmade, the one-of-a-kind, doing it the hard way instead of the cheap or easy. As Benjamin puts it, ‘Even the most perfect reproduction of a work of art is lacking in one element: its presence in time and space, its unique existence at the place where it happens to be.’

 

Today on The Aura, Chara Odhner and Mike Smith from the design studio Smith & Diction discuss what “good” design means, the ideal project, and how design can make Philadelphia an even better place to be.

 

1. How did Smith & Diction get started?

Smith & Diction was a long time coming. I (Mike) always wanted to go out on my own at some point. I always talked about doing it with some of my close friends from college. But it’s one of those things you talk about lightly without having any real idea what it takes to start a business. Chara and I met during our time at 160over90. We worked on a majority of our projects together, for a little over a year. I was just floored with how Chara could take my jumble of nonsensical ideas and turn them into something so elegant and well stated. For instance our name, Smith & Diction, pretty good right? Yeah, that’s all Chara. We were walking around New York and I was like, “I’d like to make something that kind of sounds established, something like Smith & Market or somethingggggg like that.” Chara was just like, “Oh you mean something like Smith & Diction?” Our relationship was forged out of working together so it only made sense to keep that going.

I reached the point as a designer when I was like, you want a book? I can make that. You want a logo? Sure thing. You want 20 icons? I got you covered. I just wanted a new challenge, something I had no idea how to do. So we started a business. And now, every day I learn something new. Sometimes I don’t enjoy learning it because it costs me a lot of money or time, but I’m very grateful for this entire experience.

2. What is your ideal project to work on and why?

When we first started Smith & Diction, we really wanted to get back into the restaurant scene, since we had such fun with HipCityVeg and Charlie Was a Sinner. But after spending some more time working with a few other clients, we’re realizing that we love helping people experience design without really knowing it. We’re about to kick off a project with the Rail Park and we could not be more excited to work with people like them. They are connecting people from all different kinds of neighborhoods to each other, creating a beautiful experience for the city, and providing a stage for all kinds of art and culture to coexist. It really doesn’t get much better than that. We just love being part of making this city a better place to be. I’m sure that will shift as we grow, but as of right now that’s where we’re at.

 

Explaining their new project: the Rail Park.

Explaining their new project: the Rail Park.

 

3. Who and what inspires your work? … And what is “good” design?

Man, inspiration comes from everywhere. If I were to list a bunch of names it would go on forever. I’d say my most non-traditional form of inspiration is to just go on a hike or ride my bike around the city. I try to ride for an hour or two most days, just to absorb what’s going on around me. A majority of the stuff you see in the world will never make it onto a design blog or win an award. It’s just someone trying their hardest to follow through on their dream, and sometimes they can’t afford a designer so they just do their best with what they’re given. What’s more inspiring than that? That’s passion in its truest form.

Good design is undefinable. It’s all aesthetics. Some people might like something and at the same time other people could find it repulsive. So to answer that question in the educational sense: Good design is anything that conveys an idea or direction quickly and coherently.

4. What are your hobbies outside of the design world?

Art shows, bike rides, hikes, walks, wedding planning, reading, you know just existing.

 

Mike and Chara in front of a recent wheat paste Mike created in his neighborhood.

Mike and Chara in front of a recent wheat paste Mike created in their neighborhood.

 

5. Why is Philadelphia your home base and how does the city shape your creativity?

I grew up right outside of Philly and would cut class to come skate in the city from time to time, so it was always a special place for me. I always saw coming here as a treat and I guess that never really wore off. I think I just love the rawness of it. It’s not an easy city to live in and it’s DEFINITELY not an easy city to run a small business. But Philly has such a great connection to art and community; we’re the city of murals and that’s something to be proud of. I don’t really like a majority of the murals that are up around the city aesthetically, but I completely respect a city that devotes that amount of energy to art. And the creative community here is fantastic. Most of the time people just want to grab a beer and make cool shit. They don’t care where you’re from or what your reputation is. They just want to make art for the sake of art. And just having that kind of mindset around is kind of electric.

Not to bash NYC or SF, but I feel like people tend to use each other for their own personal gain out there. When I was up in NYC for a year, people would ask to meet up and it was more of a sales pitch for their friendship rather than just a hang sesh. Here in Philly, I’ll run into people and end up having a drink with them talking about how they got engaged, and stuff like that is what I care about most. Not the places listed on someone’s resumé.

Philly is also having a moment right now. The city feels more alive than ever. The tech scene is poppin’ off and there are all sorts of community projects like Spruce Street Harbor Park, Winterfest, tons of beer gardens, etc. It just feels awesome. Stuff like that makes me want to step it up a notch. It makes me want to make stuff that makes people happy. Whether that means hanging a few hammocks or designing a system that helps someone get to a landmark easily, I just want to have a positive impact on this city.

 

Learn more about Smith & Diction here.


Art in the Age / Tamworth Distilling now available in PA

Hello Pennsylvania! We couldn’t be more excited to announce two brand new spirits releases: Art in the Age Chicory Root and Art in the Age Black Trumpet Blueberry Cordial, both available for special order at Fine Wine & Good Spirits.

Stop by the Art In the Age Store to sample a taste of both of these handcrafted spirits (while supplies last) and place your order online via Fine Wine & Good Spirits.

Or try one (or both!) in a delicious cocktail made by some of our favorite local mixologists.

Tippling the Velvet at Square 1682
Art in the Age Black Trumpet Blueberry, House made pomegranate molasses, Lime, Lillet Rose, Bluecoat Gin, Crushed ice, Mint

Purple Haze at Bardot Cafe
Art in the Age Black Trumpet Blueberry, Bluecoat Gin, Dolin Rouge, Lemon, Dash of truffle oil

Art In the Age / Tamworth Distilling Spirits are also available at:
Bourbon & Branch, Double Knot – Chicory Root
Pour – Black Trumpet Blueberry


Where to Drink AITA in New Hampshire

A few of our favorite cocktails in the Granite State.

Hobbs Tavern & Brewing

Dark Snap

Rum, SNAP, ginger brew.

 

Black Trumpet

Rhubarb Barbarella

Warres LBV Port, Rum, RHUBARB, and fresh lemon juice.

 

Flatbread Company

Rhubarb Lemonade

RHUBARB and lemonade.

 

Hobbs Tavern & Brewing

Root & Rye

ROOT, rye whiskey, soda water.

 

Hobbs Tavern & Brewing

Rhubarb Cosmo

Absolut Citron, RHUBARB, pom juice.

 

Flatbread Company

Snap Toddy

SNAP, honey, lemon, hot water.

 

In addition to these great Art in the Age cocktails, we are happy to announce our Chicory Root infusion is now available in New Hampshire state stores! Here’s a list of where you can find it: Chicory in New Hampshire. Chicory is also available for purchase at Tamworth Distilling.

Here’s a great recipe to start you off:

OLD CHICORY
2 parts AITA Chicory Root
1 part bourbon
1/2 oz maple syrup
4 dashes Jack Rudy bitters
Orange peel

Add ice to a rocks glass and express oils from orange peel into glass. Add the peel, along with the remaining ingredients and stir.


Mother’s Day Weekend at Art in the Age

 

We’ve got a packed weekend here at Art in the Age, and we’re inviting you to join us!

This First Friday (5/6) come have a Rhubarb or Sage cocktail on us and try some delicious AITA-inspired macarons
from Philly’s Brulee Bakery


Saturday and Sunday we are proud to host Philadelphia’s own Chicory Florals with a two-day bouquet sale just in time for Mother’s Day.

Chicory Florals are lovingly grown on a half acre of vacant land right here in the city of Philadelphia. Show the moms in your life how much you love them next/this weekend with local flowers (of the extremely non-basic variety) from CHICORY. Andrew and Erica are setting up shop at AITA this Mother’s Day weekend with their signature hand-tied bouquets full of all their garden favorites.

 

(CHICORY photography by Neal Santos)

 

“Show me a piece of land that God forgot—

a strip between an unused sidewalk, say,

and a bulldozed lot, rich in broken glass—

and there, July on, will be chicory…”

— JOHN UPDIKE.

 

Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, 116 North 3rd street Philadelphia, PA 19106


AITA Black Trumpet Blueberry Cordial

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What grows together, goes together.

We’re proud to announce the release of our new AITA Black Trumpet Blueberry Cordial! Our latest small-batch infusion is a unique blend of tart blueberries and foraged black trumpet mushrooms. This unique cordial from Tamworth Distilling was made in collaboration with our friends at the New Hampshire Mushroom Company. House-grown lavender and lemon verbena reinforce the fresh flavors, creating a rare cordial that brings to mind a prize-winning blueberry pie.

Pick it up in-store Friday through Sunday at Tamworth Distilling or order it online at Prospect Wine Shop. 

 

 


The Aura – Joe Beddia

Welcome to this month’s installment of The Aura. Once a month, we’ll sit down with an artist, maker, or other creative who represents the Art in the Age philosophy.

When we started Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, we were inspired by Walter Benjamin’s 1935 essay of the same name. One of the main theories he presents is that of the aura – a quality that a piece of art has that separates it from something mass-produced. There’s an inherent value in the handmade, the one-of-a-kind, doing it the hard way instead of the cheap or easy. As Benjamin puts it, ‘Even the most perfect reproduction of a work of art is lacking in one element: its presence in time and space, its unique existence at the place where it happens to be.’

 

Today on The Aura, Philly’s own pizza superstar Joe Beddia discusses the perfect pie, designing a workplace that works, local music as a soundtrack, and why natural wine is like something your grandfather would have made.

1. How did this pizza making life begin?

I left my life as a beer brewer and began working in restaurants. Basically a 28 year old busboy. I was thirsty for learning about wine and food. During that time I kind up picked of pizza as a hobby. I would spend my off time either traveling and eating pizza or experimenting at home. I also decided to begin a ‘stage’ at Osteria shortly after they opened. It was my first foray into the back of house. They were very professional and hard working. I think I saw what it took to do something at a high level there. I also knew that I’d like to be more focused. Pizza was a side project that eventually became a career.

 

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2. What are some of your favorite pizzerias and what makes them so special?

My favorite pizzerias are Una Pizza Napoletana (San Francisco), DiFara Pizzeria (Brooklyn, NY), Pizzeria Bianco (Phoenix, AZ), and the now closed Great Lake (Chicago, IL). They all helped shape the way I make pizza now. I took from all of them. They’re all perfect pizzas in their own way.

 

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3. Tell us about your workspace. What’s the music played, the aesthetic, and why Fishtown?

Pizzeria Beddia is a tiny 350sq ft space. It’s clean and efficient. I “designed” it really the only way possible. There weren’t a lot of options. I only use American made equipment. I wanted it to be a space that felt good, especially because of the amount of time I knew I would spend there. We have a really nice sound system. I started playing mostly old country music- at least for the first year and a half. Waylon, Willie, John Prine. Then I went into Bill Evans. He calms me down. Lately it’s been some local guys like Spacin’, Kurt Vile, Steve Gunn. Also kind of obsessed with Black Sabbath and Dead Moon.

 

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4. If you could make a pie for any one person who would it be and why?

I’m a big fan of stand up comedy. Probably more influenced from that than anything else. It’s the only place to go for honesty. Better if its brutal and dark too. Howard Stern is a hero. Or Louis CK.

 

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5. What are your hobbies outside the business?

My hobby right now is probably drinking natural wine. Hope that doesn’t sound pretentious. It’s like a lot of things that I really respect in life. Doing stuff the way your grandfather or great grandfather did. You can really say that about a ton of stuff like pizza. But natural wine is more of an expression of a place and a season. It’s kind of romantic I guess.