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Add RHUBARB to your Raspberry Chamomile Cream Soda

Add RHUBARB to your Raspberry Chamomile Cream Soda

04/02/2015
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Raspberry Chamomile Cream Sodas for the pig & quill’s baby shower!

One of the best things {maybe the only thing?} about moving to a brand new place in the dead of winter is slowly discovering what your world looks like in color. Winter is such a monochromatic scene of greys and browns, it’s pretty easy to lose sight of what your world looks like all vibrant and stuff. The past few weeks here in St. Louis have been like, full on solid springtime. The days have been warmer and sunnier and longer. The leaves on the trees are beginning to bud and the daffodils are now fully grown. And even though I can’t find very much locally sourced spring produce {mini rant on this here} – I consider myself pretty lucky as my east coast friends are still getting slammed with snow. I’m really sorry you guys!!

Since this blog is a reflection of my real life, I try to be as transparent as I can. A few weeks ago, I talked abouteating pizza and how I try not to take my relationship with food all too seriously. Today I wanna talk about eating foods that are out of season in the wintertime. I get it, you get it, we all get it, eating locally sourced foods are good for us and good for our world and good for our economies. But also, it’s okay to bend the rules – especially to save your sanity. Because sometimes, in the dead of winter {or in the early spring before your farmers’ markets are open and any local produce is available you} you just need a little brightness in your life.

I find myself craving foods {mainly fruits} like pineapple and mangoes and berries in the cold months. Kind of like how you find yourself daydreaming of lying on a beach in the Caribbean and all you want to do is take a vacation – and if you could get there, your brain would be in a much better place. I find it more than acceptable to buy these foods out of season, on occasion, when you need/want them. This past winter, I was on a real frozen raspberry kick. I bought them at Trader Joe’s by the cartload. I put them in smoothies, I put them in cereals and sometimes I just popped ‘em back for a little frozen snack.

Today we’re blending those raspberries up with some relaxing chamomile tea for a super chill raspberry chamomile cream soda for my friend Emily‘s surprise baby shower. SURPRISE EMILY – you are such a ray of light bursting with positive energy and charming wit. So much love to you as you welcome your first human into this world. Emily today is for you, we love you. #EmsPigletParty!!

My friend Gina and I rounded up 18 bloggers who love and adore Emily as much as we do. Check them out, they’re all lovely and they’ve all made Emily some super delicious stuffs.

So…Let’s Hang Out

Cake Over Steak

Will Frolic For Food

Earthy Feast

Fix Feast Flair

Jewhungry

The Food Gays

Lady and Pups

Two Red Bowls

Beard and Bonnet

Dula Notes

A Little Saffron

The Bojon Gourmet

Nosh and Nourish

Loves Food, Loves to Eat

Tasty Yummies

I am a Food Blog

Dunk & Crumble

80twenty

Raspberry Chamomile Cream Sodas {print me!}

Notes: I have only made these drinks with frozen raspberries, but I assume you can make them with fresh raspberries without any changes. This recipe will make about 8 drinks and it can be easily made into a double batch.

Ingredients:

o   2 cups filtered water

o   1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon loose chamomile tea

o   2 tablespoons honey {or maple syrup or sugar}

o   2 cups of frozen raspberries {+ more for garnish}

o   1/2 cup coconut milk

o   2 – 3 cans of club soda

o   ice

o   BOOZE! {optional, see below}

Bring the water to a boil, place the loose chamomile tea into a tea bag and steep the chamomile tea for 5 minutes. Discard the tea bag and set the tea aside to cool for a bit, once it’s warm add in the honey and stir to dissolve completely. Set the tea aside again and allow it to reach room temperature {you can put it in the refrigerator to speed up the process}. Blend the chamomile tea with the raspberries until smooth.

Fill a tall glass with ice, then add in the 1/4 cup of the raspberry mixture, a tablespoon of coconut milk and top the rest club soda. Give it a gentle stir + serve with a few raspberries on top.

Optional but highly recommended: add in a shot of your favorite booze!! I prefer RHUBARB by Art in the Age the flavors are magical together.

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Raspberry Chamomile Cream Sodas for the pig & quill’s baby shower! 

Seasonal cocktails at Bone Fish Grill include RHUBARB

Seasonal cocktails at Bone Fish Grill include RHUBARB

04/02/2015
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BONEFISH GRILL FIRE AND ICE PRE-FIXE MENU

March 30, 2015 By Linda Arceo Leave a Comment

On Saturday I was invited by my local Bonefish Grill to try out the new Bonefish Grill Fire and Ice Pre-Fixe Menu. Bonefish Grill is easily one of my family’s favorite chain restaurants and with two little seafood lovers, the invitation was an easy yes and one we looked forward to with great excitement.

Bonefish Grill’s award-winning Chef Cliff Pleau has juxtaposed flavors + textures that are both spicy + nice. The new Fire + Ice Pre-Fixe menu features three innovatively generous courses starting at $19.90Bonefish Grill features culinary forward and unique combinations on the three-course menu (from both land and sea) which begin with your choice of Bonefish House Salad or Classic Caesar Salad, followed by the entrée and finishing off with fresh Sugar Doughnuts with dark chocolate and sea salt caramel sauce.

To start off our meal, we decided to partake in a few of Bonefish Grill’s seasonal cocktails. I chose the Blueberry Cold Snap Cocktail which was served in a frozen glass made entirely of ice and filled with house-made infusion of fresh blueberries, Reyka vodka, Art in the Age liqueur and lemon and finished with a hint of lavender bitters and aromatic lavender.

$8.50

 

My husband was feeling a little under the weather with a head cold so he ordered The Mule, a traditional moscow mule featuring Grey Goose vodka, fresh lime, house-made ginger syrup, ginger beer and finished in a copper mug with crushed ice, fresh mint and candied ginger.

$7.50

 

For my salad, I opted for the Classic Caesar Salad topped with anchovies. Hubby went for the traditional house salad.

Not one to ever resist fresh oysters, the hubby and I ordered the Spice + Ice Fresh Oysters Starter which included fresh oysters topped with a Habanero mignonette for a spicy kick. I loved these oysters so much. I would’ve eaten dozens of them.

 

$12

 

My little dudes couldn’t resist the Fire and Ice Menu so they opted to order from the adults menu rather than the kiddie menu (raising foodies has resulted in very sophisticated palates).

My youngest ordered the Peel + Eat Fire Red Shrimp as his main meal and my oldest ordered theCold Water Lobster Tail. We also ordered some steamed edamame on the side for them to nibble on as well.

$9.50

 

$15.90 / $19.90 Price-Fixe

 

Hubby opted for a meat course as his entrée. He went with the Grilled Lamb Chops featuring tender lollipop chops seasoned and lightly caramelized, crispy Yukon potatoes and sugar snap peas. The lamb chops were finished with a balsamic demi-glaze.

$20.50 / $24.50 Price-Fixe.

 

For my entrée, I decided to go with the Spring Steelhead Trout,  a species of Rainbow Trout (smiliar to salmon) paired with Mediterranean grains, edamame falafel and a cucumber Tzatziki drizzle.

 

$23.90

 

Other Price-Fixe menu options include:

  • Dynamite Opah — Nicknamed “moonfish,” Opah is a great fish for the grill with a firm steak-like texture. It’s topped with lump Crab meat, sautéed spinach, and finished with a creamy aioli.
  • Shrimp + Scallop Firepot— Jumbo shrimps and scallops finished firepot style, served with rustic cut vegetables and Yukon gold potatoes. Finished with spring sugar snap peas.
  • Oscar Turbot— From the land of fire and ice, Greenland Turbot is sautéed piccata-style and topped with jumbo lump crab meat and asparagus. Served with mushroom ravioli, spring peas and roasted pepper.

To finish the meal, we enjoyed these perfect and delectable DIY Doughnuts — a Bonefish Grill house specialty of croissant-like doughnut holes, tossed in cinnamon sugar that guests fill with sea salt caramel and chocolate sauce. These were the highlight of the meal for me. These doughnuts were insane! I loved, loved, loved them.

The Bonefish Grill Fire and Ice Pre-Fixe menu is not to be missed. If you plan on visiting Bonefish Grill make sure to take advantage of their special offer. The Fresh Fish Experts at Bonefish Grill are welcoming the Spring season in a big way by offering a $10 gift valid March 21 through April 6. Just think – that’s a free cocktail or appetizer. Such a deal!

Bonefish Grill Fire and Ice Pre-Fixe menu is GGG approved! Go check it out today!

I was invited by Bonefish Grill to check out their new Fire and Ice Pre-Fixe menu. As always, opinions are my own.

 

Special thanks to the staff at Bonefish Grill Deptford for their amazing service and meal!

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BONEFISH GRILL FIRE AND ICE PRE-FIXE MENU 

BLVD. Cocktail Company in Las Vegas serve SAGE cocktails

BLVD. Cocktail Company in Las Vegas serve SAGE cocktails

04/02/2015
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13 Dashes of Las Vegas Restaurant News

By Joyce Lupiani. CREATED Mar 30, 2015

If you haven’t realized it by now, Vegas is a GREAT place to live if you love to eat . Here is the latest restaurant news from around the valley.

1. Kids will be able to eat for free three days a week beginning April 1 at the House of Blues inside Mandalay Bay. Kids under the age of 12 will be able to eat for free from the Crossroad’s Kids Menu with the purchase of an adult entree from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Wednesdays. Menu includes pasta with housemade marinara, mac and cheese, mini cheeseburgers, chicken tenders and more. Ends May 27.

2. A Belgium brewery dinner on April 8 at Made L.V. will feature the finest beers, ales and lagers from New Belgium Brewery and guest chef Michael Van Staden. The menu will include oxtail spring rolls, Pad Thai pig ears, hand-cranked sausages, Moroccan chicken tagine, and salted coffee chocolate stout cake. Cost is $39, plus tax and gratuity.

3. “Get whisted” at lunch at Whist Stove and Spirits. The restaurant will cater to “ladies who lunch” with a special menu available from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. every Monday through Friday beginning April 6. Appetizers such as grilled goat cheese and beef skewers will be priced at $7. A half & half combo of soup or salad and a sandwich will be priced at $15. A Tails & Tinis menu will feature petite-versions of signature cocktails. Groups of women will receive a discount. Ladies who use the hashtags #WomenWhoWhist and #GetWhisted will have a chance to win a gift certificate.

4. Searsucker Las Vegas is now open at Caesars Palace. The restaurant serves New American classic cuisine under the direction of Chef Brian Malarkey, a judge and mentor on ABC’s reality series “The Taste” and a “Top Chef” finalist, and Chef de Cuisine Jean Paul Labadie from Puerto Rico. Named after the simplicity of the seersucker fabric, which is casual and emanates a relaxed vibe among those who wear it, Searsucker seeks to evoke that same feeling in its dishes and atmosphere. Happy Hour menu items include $4 duck fat fries, $6 farm bird lollips and street tacos, $8 squid “sweet heat” and shrimp and bacon grits, and $10 crab cakes. Drink prices range from $5 (beer) to $11 (specialty cocktails) during Happy Hour (4:30-6 p.m. daily).

5. Las Vegas’ first bean-to-bar craft chocolate maker and “approachable” American cuisine and “spellbinding” cocktails are featured at the new HEXX kitchen | bar | chocolate at Paris Las Vegas. HEXX serves breakfast, lunch and dinner and is open 24/7. Signature selections include prime filet served with spring asparagus and sea-salt garlic butter, chicken and waffles, a classic Kobe beef burger, spaghetti carbonara, oven-fired pepperoni pizza, and grilled king salmon. HEXX also offers handcrafted cocktails and 25 draft and bottled beer options. For its chocolate, HEXX uses cacao beans sourced from farms located 20 degrees north and south of the equator and transforms them into craft chocolate.

6. Freddy’s Frozen Custard & Steakburgers opened its newest location last week in Henderson on West Warm Springs Road. The restaurant features lean-beef steakburgers, Vienna Beef hot dogs, and shoestring fries, as well as a large assortment of dessert treats prepared with your choice of freshly-churned chocolate or vanilla frozen custard. Freddy’s is a family-friendly restaurant that seeks to recreate how life was in the late 1940s and early 1950s — a post-war era of pride and values focusing on unity and quality family time.

7. Rockhouse Vegas is now offering a $20 all-inclusive ROCK brunch from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays. The brunch at ultra-dive bar at The Venetian/The Palazzo will feature a down-home menu and bottomless libations including mimosas, Bloody Marys, draft beer and well cocktails. Some of the dishes include chorizo and egg tacos, green chili and egg tacos, breakfast dogs and scrambled eggs topped with cheddar cheese. Price does not include tax or tip. Available beginning April 5.

8. Tapas by Alex Stratta will open in Tivoli Village on April 8 and will be serving from 5 to 10 p.m. nightly. The restaurant will serve a variety of cultivated and contemporary small plates driven by the flavors of the Mediterranean with prominent Spanish accents. The bar will also complement the menu with a carefully curated beer list including 5 Spanish selections, signature cocktails featuring Spanish sherries, and Spanish wine from around the world. The 5,401-square-foot restaurant is washed in a rustic and rich yellow color palette with red and white accents and also has a 2,000-square-foot patio. In addition, there is a private upstairs dining room for special events.

9. Miller’s Ale House at Town Square has introduced a new late-night Happy Hour and it is hard to beat. $2 well drinks include all flavors of Smirnoff vodka, Sauza Blue tequila, Captain Morgan Spiced Rum and Bud or Bud Light pint drags. $3 call includes Bacardi rum, Jim Bean, and Jameson whiskey. $4 premium includes Ketel One vodka, Crown Royal, Bulleit Bourbon, Grey Goose and Jack Daniels. Most appetizers are only $5. Hours are 10 p.m. to close Sundays through Thursdays.

10. Local produce and and gourmet wine will be featured during a dinner at MRKT Sea & Land on April 22. MRKT will feature seven dishes from the sea, land, air and garden paired with wines from Justin Vineyards & Winery and Landmark Vineyards. Menu highlights include caviar in a Yukon Gold potato nest; a salad featuring ingredients from the restaurant’s garden and Gilcrease Orchard; crispy duck served with hunter-style beluga lentils, wild mushrooms and spring onions from local Cowboy Trail Farms; a mesquite-fired filet mignon and spotted prawn; braised short rib in a smoked cheddar pomme puree; and a locally-sourced salted caramel apple tart. Executive Chef George Jacquez’s dinner will be priced at $100 per person. Call 702-692-7265 or 702-692-7320 after 5 p.m. to make reservations.

11. BLVD. Cocktail Company, located in the heart of The LINQ, has introduced some cool cocktails to combat the warmer temps. The Rockette features Art in the Age Sage Neutral Spirit, lemon juice, simple syrup, strawberries, basil leaves and soda water; The Lost Generation, crafted with Denzien Rum, lime juice, brandied cherry, Luxardo Liqueur, CelloVia Grapefruit Lime Cordial and Scrappy’s Cardamom bitters; the Left-Handed Race, crafted with Elijah Craig 12 Year Bourbon Whiskey, lime juice, ginger syrup and ginger beer; and The Lanfranconi, featuring seasoned apple infused scotch whiskey, Campari, Averna Amaro and absinthe rinse. All cocktails are $14 each.

12. Graeter’s Ice Cream is now open inside the Forum Food Court at Caesars Palace. A Cincinnati institution, Graeter’s Ice Cream at Forum Food Court is the first location west of the Mississippi. Founded in 1870, the family owned-and-operated brand has gained a cult following, including notable celebrities like Sarah Jessica Parker and Harry Connick Jr., thanks to their unique French Pot process which produces only 2½ gallons at a time. The Forum Food Court location will feature signature flavors, including the famous black raspberry chocolate chip, mint chocolate chip, caramel truffle gelato and lemon sorbet.

13. Not all of the great restaurants are located on the Las Vegas Strip or in downtown Las Vegas. Table 89, a fast-casual dining experience, opened in the Centennial Hills area in February. Table 89 serves a wide selection of new small plates, soups, sandwiches, entrees, salads, pizzas, pastas and desserts. The restaurant uses local, organic and nutritionally-balanced ingredients to create globally-inspired cuisine. After ordering and paying at the counter, guests may either take their food to-go or take a number and dine at the restaurant.

 

If you would like to submit restaurant news for one of our #13Things lists, send an email to jlupiani@ktnv.com.

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13 Dashes of Las Vegas Restaurant News 

Paste Magazine features 4 Boozy Popsicles from Art in the Age

Paste Magazine features 4 Boozy Popsicles from Art in the Age

04/02/2015
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4 Boozy Popsicles from Art in the Age Spirits

By Graham Averill

March 27, 2015  |  1:34pm

Art in the Age isn’t your typical distillery. They don’t make whiskey or gin or vodka. Instead, they’ve made it their mission to revive an ancient liquor called “Root Tea,” a drink cultivated by Native Americans and passed on to European settlers. Once white people got ahold of it, they turned it into a potent booze that was enjoyed in the Eastern U.S. for centuries. Then the temperance movement happened and, according to legend, the alcohol was removed from Root Tea by a Pennsylvania pharmacist, and rechristened “Root Beer.” Now, Art in the Age makes a certified organic version of the original Root Tea that they call, simply, Root. It’s an 80-proof spirit that has a slightly sweet, herbal quality.

After Root, Art in the Age turned their attention to other esoteric spirits. Now they make Snap (a ginger-snap spirit), Rhubarb and Sage. Each has their own distinct flavor, each is good over ice. But in my opinion, these are the sort of strong-willed spirits that are meant to be mixed in cocktails. You can keep it simple (Root and gingerale is a bomber summer cocktail) or get crazy. Like, boozy popsicle crazy.

Here then, are four boozy popsicles using Art in the Age spirits. Because why should kids get to have all the fun this summer?

SNAP Spiced Coconut Popsicles 

Ingredients
3 1/2 cups coconut milk
1/2 cup toasted coconut
1/2 cups + 2 tbsp organic cane sugar
3 tbsp SNAP Liqueur

Directions: In a mixing bowl combine the coconut milk, toasted coconut, sugar and SNAP. Whisk to combine and dissolve the sugar. Pour mixture into the ice pop molds and freeze for 1 hour before inserting the sticks. Insert the sticks and then allow to freeze for 4 hours or until solid.

ROOT Mint Julep Popsicles

Ingredients
2 1/2 cups water
1 cup demerara sugar
1 cup mint
1/3 cup ROOT

Directions: 1. Add sugar and water to a medium pot over medium-low heat and stir until the sugar completely dissolves.
2. Once the sugar has dissolved, turn off the heat and add in fresh mint. Lightly muddle the mint with a muddler or wooden spoon. Let this seep until the mixture has cooled to room temperature (about 45 minutes). Once it has cooled, strain through a fine mesh strainer.
3. Add in the ROOT and stir to combine. Then pour into your popsicle molds. Place this in the freezer and check back after 45 minutes (or longer depending on the temperature of your freezer) and add in the popsicle sticks. Keep in the freezer until frozen solid.

SAGE Cucumber Ginger Basil Popsicles

Ingredients
1 Large Cucumber
2 Limes
2 oz. Simple Syrup
2 oz. SAGE liquor
1 cup Reed’s ginger beer

Directions: Makes eight pops 1. In a blender combine the cucumber, the juice from two limes, simple syrup, ginger beer and SAGE. Blend this until the mixture is smooth.
2. Pour the mixture into the popsicle molds and let it sit for 1-2 hours until the pops are solid enough to hold popsicle sticks. Freeze for 10-12 hours.

RHUBARB Strawberry Basil Lemonade Popsicles

Ingredients
1 ½ cups Raspberry Lemonade
1 cup fresh Strawberries
1 cup Sugar
1 cup Water
5 fresh basil leaves
¼ cup RHUBARB Tea

Directions: 1. First make the basil simple syrup. Combine 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water in a small sauce pan and warm it over a medium-high heat until the sugar is dissolved. Remove it from the burner and add in 5 fresh basil leaves. Once the simple syrup has cooled to room temperature, strain out the basil leaves and transfer it to the refrigerator to cool.
2. Combine the 1½ cup raspberry lemonade, the 1¼ cup basil simple syrup and the 1/4 cup RHUBARB Tea into a large bowl. Mix well.
3. Pour the mixture into your popsicle molds. Then drop in the strawberries. Let this sit for 1-2 hours before adding in the popsicle sticks. It needs to be solid enough to hold the stick from sinking to the bottom, but not too hard so it resists going in.
4. Let freeze for 7-10 hours, then enjoy!

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4 Boozy Popsicles from Art in the Age Spirits 

Bone Fish Grill serves up an excellent Blueberry Cold Snap cocktail which features RHUBARB

Bone Fish Grill serves up an excellent Blueberry Cold Snap cocktail which features RHUBARB

04/02/2015
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#IncredibleIs – My first trip to Bonefish Grill

29 Mar, 2015  in Restaurants  tagged restaurants Review by Nick Lucs

I love seafood. I’m a regular fresh water fisher and have done a couple of deep sea fishing adventures off the coast of Florida. Now, of course, it’s going to be a little bit more difficult to find seafood like you can in Florida, but there are a couple places in Des Moines that can provide such quality. I’m from West Des Moines, and once West Glen was put up all I kept hearing about was Bonefish. A lot of people would visit this restaurant for special occasions such as prom and special date nights. Well, I hadn’t taken part in attending the date night/visiting crowd until just this past weekend (3/27/15). I was very excited. I told family and friends that I was going and the first thing EVERYONE told me was to get the Bang Bang shrimp.

Did I order it? Let’s find out:

Walking up to the restaurant was really exhilarating. Why? It’s because you walk into a rotating door and your world turns into a dark and vibrant restaurant setting. The staff was bustling with drinks, and what appeared to be Bang Bang Shrimp. A great soundtrack and an excellent host staff greeted my date and I (contributor Anna Buenneke) and sat us down just in time for our reservation.

Bone Fish Appetizer – Starters

Well, sure enough. The first thing we ordered from our waiter was Bang Bang Shrimp ($10.50). I figured that it would be about 6 pieces of shrimp but no way. It was a bowl that was piled with shrimp. I loved the mayonnaise sauce which had a little kick at the end. Just what I like. We even ate the little salad bed at the end because it had some sauce left over on it – you can’t let it go to waste.

Drinks

My date and I ordered a Moscow Mule and a Blueberry Cold Snap cocktail, respectively. Their Blueberry Cold Snap features a house-made infusion of fresh blueberries + Reyka vodka, organic Art in the Age Rhubarb liqueur + lemon. Finished in seasonal fashion with a hint or lavender bitters + aromatic lavender stem. The really cool part of the drink – it’s served in a glass made completely of ice!

Entrees

Spicy Tuna Bowl

When you hear that phrase it leaves a lot to the imagination. The description promised fresh rare tuna, sliced avocado, white seasoned rice, mango salsa, shredded carrots, sweet chile sauce, and a garnish of crispy wonton strips. That outline didn’t do it justice-when my entree arrived it was bursting with flavor, size, and color. I couldn’t wait to take a bite.

The sesame encrusted tuna appealed to my inner sushi lover instantly. However, if you aren’t a fan of raw meat this dish isn’t for you. Swirled in the slightly tangy chile sauce, it made my mouth pop with flavor.

Another surprise was the rice-it was lightly seasoned but had a refreshingly moist and sticky texture-much unlike the over-cooked, bland rice one comes to expect with their meal these days.

Two finishing touches that sealed the deal were the generous portion of perfectly ripe avocado and raw mango salsa. Flavorfully served on the side, they made the dish irresistible when tossed in with the rice and a bite of tuna. If living vicariously through my tastebuds isn’t enticing enough alone, let me hit you with the fact this succulent dish is under $13.

– Anna

Shrimp + Scallop Firepot

The Bang Bang Shrimp must’ve kept my mind on shrimp the rest of the night because this was the entree that caught my attention. The shrimp and scallop firepot is part of a feature they have going on called the Bonefish Grill Fire + Ice Prix Fixe

It starts off with your choice of house or Caesar salad. I went with the house salad with some added blue cheese crumbles.

The shrimp and scallop firepot is all about bringing spicy Latin flavors together to create an ultimate summer dish. Big shrimp and nice sized scallops are finished firepot-style with rustic cut vegetables, roasted potatoes, topped with chipotle-infused aioli. It was like I was sitting on a beach enjoying a fire cooked meal. The flavors were bold and the aioli sauce was excellent with the shrimp.

With my dinner, I enjoyed a Menage a Trois Red which was recommended by our waiter.

- Nick

Dessert

Dessert was part of my prix fixe meal. Although, we were tempted by the dessert menu, there was only room left for the decadent doughnuts. These warm, sugar coated morsels came with two miniature bottles of sea salt caramel or chocolate.

They were really fun to make, and extremely delicious.

Betcha can’t just have one – good thing there are three.

Service

I have to give a shoutout to our great waiter, Chad. He was very friendly, did a great job of waiting on us and gave Anna and I excellent recommendations. When you make a reservation, be sure to ask for him!

All in all, it was a wonderful experience. I’m kind of bummed that I waited this long to visit.

 

My final note: You know a place is Foodster when they play Andrew McMahon. [specifically this song]

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#IncredibleIs My first trip to Bonefish Grill 

SAGE Advice cocktail at the Rabbit Hole

SAGE Advice cocktail at the Rabbit Hole

04/02/2015
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The Rabbit Hole throws a spring break cocktail rager at Midtown Global Market.

Sage Advice at the Rabbit Hole
Michael Rietmulder

The Rabbit Hole team recently returned from a weeklong spring break. Unless you’re a spoiled coed with rich parents, you may not have been so lucky. But thanks to cocktail captain Thomas Kim, you can drink your spring break at his Korean gastropub at Midtown Global Market.

Heed ours and order an herbaceous Sage Advice, using a class-defying sage spirit from Art in the Age — a Philadelphia organic distillery that also makes soap, quilts and expensive sweaters. Sage instead of juniper leads the botanical medley of thyme, rosemary, lavender, fennel and others in this gin-like spirit.

The grass is still brown, but this verdurous sour-style cocktail is blooming with muddled cucumber and basil syrup, and brightened with lemon juice and Easy & Oskey orange-coriander bitters. The vegetal garden-in-a-glass beats slamming rail tequila at Señor Frogs and reduces the odds of waking up with a penis drawn on your face. So, call it a win-win. (The Rabbit Hole, Midtown Global Market, 920 E. Lake St., Mpls. www.eatdrinkrabbit.com.)

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The Rabbit Hole throws a spring break cocktail rager at Midtown Global Market. 

Franky Bradley’s mixes SNAP in their punch

Franky Bradley’s mixes SNAP in their punch

03/27/2015
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Franky Bradley’s breathes new life into a storied restaurant space

 

By Adam Erace

Published 03/26/2015

Frankie Bloch was a South Philly boxer. And Jewish, at a time (circa 1910) when the big prizefighters had surnames like Quinlan, Russell, Doyle, O’Brien and Dunn. So to better fit in with his Irish competitors, Bloch became Bradley.

He won. A lot. Saved $6,000 and bought a luncheonette, which he parlayed into several other restaurants, the last of which was Frankie Bradley’s Romanian Inn, a smoky steakhouse and celebrity hang that opened at the backstreet intersection of Chancellor and Juniper in 1933. Bradley died in 1976, a decade shy of his restaurant’s 53rd — and final — birthday.

Frankie Bradley’s became Hesch’s for a while after that, then had a 17-year run as Sisters, the city’s only female-focused LGBT nightclub. When Mark Bee, the early adopter behind neighborhood-defining operations like North 3rd and Silk City, heard that Sisters had closed, he immediately inquired about the Tudor-style space: “I loved the whole layout,” he says, “and as I did the research, I loved it even more.”

Bee’s Franky Bradley’s — “I always spelled ‘Franky’ with a Y,” he shrugs — opened two months ago. To duck under the black marquee awning and into this resurrected refuge is to step into a surrealist version of the past. Bee’s Bradley’s feels old, but a bit twisted. Thickets of knotted antlers wreath an arched dining alcove. Glasses on brass bar rails dangle upside-down like slumbering bats. Fringed gypsy lamps whisper in invisible breezes. It’s Twin Peaks meets VFW hall.

A heady reddish glow permeates the place. It feels like it comes from within the century-old pine-paneled walls, some kind of inner life force activated by its peculiar collection of bewitching objects. They emerge slowly, as if out of a mist: knights charging into battle, a Pam Greer portrait, petrified fish and stuffed pheasants, a High Life Pennsylvania license plate, a picture of ghosts who are either giving each other the Heimlich or doing it doggy-style. Bee is a chronic collector, and what wasn’t unearthed in upstate flea markets, salvage yards and antique shops, his roommate, artist Scott Johnston, painted. “He’s also our doorman on the weekends.”

In my darkened corner of Franky Bradley’s, a hissing medusa hovered overhead, her expression nefarious, hungry. Did she want to turn me to stone, or just the stone-ground Doylestown grits arrayed about my plate of crispy chicken livers and sweet-hot pepper jelly?

That was one of the best efforts from chef Dave Kane, a four-year veteran of Silk City, who also did time at Fork, Pif and Bar Ferdinand. Of the menu at Bradley’s, he says, “We wanted to have something for everybody, but different from what they’re used to at our other restaurants.”

So the food here trends a little more upscale, a little more plated: head-on shrimp with flageolet beans, brandade with piquillo peppers, a grilled bone-in rib eye. Pan-browned gnocchi dotted whorls of butternut squash puree in one entrée; they were a little gummy, with skins that gave them the texture of dumplings, but the flavors were on-point on an ice-cold night: caramelized Brussels sprouts, nutty toasted almonds, tangy cranberry brown butter, salt shaved Parm.

The French onion soup was in need of more Comté and a sturdier crouton. As for the wings, it’s rare to find ones that are both crispy and tender, but these had the right textural contrast — thanks to a two-step process that includes gently cooking the paprika-and-oregano-rubbed chicken in the basement smoker, then quickly crisping them in the fryer. Brown-sugared bourbon barbecue coated the wings in thick maroon lacquer. “I wanted to do something different than Buffalo,” Kane says. “I’m really proud of them.” He should be.

He should also be proud of the escarole salad, the frilly leaves of the bitter greens charred on the grill before getting tossed with punchy Caesar dressing, hard-cooked egg, Parm, bread crumbs and curly boquerones. This wasn’t groundbreaking — but it was well executed, flavorful and satisfying.

Latkes were spun into crunchy nests with threads of celery root, potato and onion. Peels of lush house-smoked salmon mixed with crème frâiche, celery leaf, lemon and chives sat atop each pancake. Beneath, sticky amber apple butter provided a sweet counterpoint. The same fruit butter appeared in one of the des­serts, a golden deep-fried apple pie (modeled after Mickey D’s) that Kane filled with Hon­eycrisps, Granny Smiths and Galas and topped with housemade vanilla ice cream. Flour­less chocolate cake, chocolate pudding, Or­eo crumbs, whipped cream and candied pea­­nuts layered up for a Mississippi mud in trifle form.

The hibiscus-pink Franky’s Punch was sweet enough to qualify as its own dessert, but sneaky strong with Sailor Jerry, SNAP and Drambuie dosing a vanilla/apple cider base. The cava-topped crème de violette-and-St. Germaine Viva La Diva, meanwhile, was the kind of drink you would give a mom who doesn’t drink. Mine crushed one and promptly ordered another. Beer-wise you’ve got names like Firestone Walker, Neshaminy Creek and Founders in a list of 10 taps and 28 bottles that also includes an unfortunate number of macros. Maybe it’s a tribute to the boxer that gave this address its name. I can’t imagine Frankie Bradley kicking back with a pint of St. Feuillien saison.

 

Franky Bradley’s | 320 Chancellor St., 215-735-0735, frankybradleys.com. Daily, 5 p.m.-1 a.m. (bar until 2 a.m.). Appetizers, $8-$16; sandwiches, $11-$14; entrees, $18-$29; desserts, $7.

Franky Bradley’s breathes new life into a storied restaurant space

 

By Adam Erace

Published 03/26/2015

Frankie Bloch was a South Philly boxer. And Jewish, at a time (circa 1910) when the big prizefighters had surnames like Quinlan, Russell, Doyle, O’Brien and Dunn. So to better fit in with his Irish competitors, Bloch became Bradley.

He won. A lot. Saved $6,000 and bought a luncheonette, which he parlayed into several other restaurants, the last of which was Frankie Bradley’s Romanian Inn, a smoky steakhouse and celebrity hang that opened at the backstreet intersection of Chancellor and Juniper in 1933. Bradley died in 1976, a decade shy of his restaurant’s 53rd — and final — birthday.

Frankie Bradley’s became Hesch’s for a while after that, then had a 17-year run as Sisters, the city’s only female-focused LGBT nightclub. When Mark Bee, the early adopter behind neighborhood-defining operations like North 3rd and Silk City, heard that Sisters had closed, he immediately inquired about the Tudor-style space: “I loved the whole layout,” he says, “and as I did the research, I loved it even more.”

Bee’s Franky Bradley’s — “I always spelled ‘Franky’ with a Y,” he shrugs — opened two months ago. To duck under the black marquee awning and into this resurrected refuge is to step into a surrealist version of the past. Bee’s Bradley’s feels old, but a bit twisted. Thickets of knotted antlers wreath an arched dining alcove. Glasses on brass bar rails dangle upside-down like slumbering bats. Fringed gypsy lamps whisper in invisible breezes. It’s Twin Peaks meets VFW hall.

A heady reddish glow permeates the place. It feels like it comes from within the century-old pine-paneled walls, some kind of inner life force activated by its peculiar collection of bewitching objects. They emerge slowly, as if out of a mist: knights charging into battle, a Pam Greer portrait, petrified fish and stuffed pheasants, a High Life Pennsylvania license plate, a picture of ghosts who are either giving each other the Heimlich or doing it doggy-style. Bee is a chronic collector, and what wasn’t unearthed in upstate flea markets, salvage yards and antique shops, his roommate, artist Scott Johnston, painted. “He’s also our doorman on the weekends.”

In my darkened corner of Franky Bradley’s, a hissing medusa hovered overhead, her expression nefarious, hungry. Did she want to turn me to stone, or just the stone-ground Doylestown grits arrayed about my plate of crispy chicken livers and sweet-hot pepper jelly?

That was one of the best efforts from chef Dave Kane, a four-year veteran of Silk City, who also did time at Fork, Pif and Bar Ferdinand. Of the menu at Bradley’s, he says, “We wanted to have something for everybody, but different from what they’re used to at our other restaurants.”

So the food here trends a little more upscale, a little more plated: head-on shrimp with flageolet beans, brandade with piquillo peppers, a grilled bone-in rib eye. Pan-browned gnocchi dotted whorls of butternut squash puree in one entrée; they were a little gummy, with skins that gave them the texture of dumplings, but the flavors were on-point on an ice-cold night: caramelized Brussels sprouts, nutty toasted almonds, tangy cranberry brown butter, salt shaved Parm.

The French onion soup was in need of more Comté and a sturdier crouton. As for the wings, it’s rare to find ones that are both crispy and tender, but these had the right textural contrast — thanks to a two-step process that includes gently cooking the paprika-and-oregano-rubbed chicken in the basement smoker, then quickly crisping them in the fryer. Brown-sugared bourbon barbecue coated the wings in thick maroon lacquer. “I wanted to do something different than Buffalo,” Kane says. “I’m really proud of them.” He should be.

He should also be proud of the escarole salad, the frilly leaves of the bitter greens charred on the grill before getting tossed with punchy Caesar dressing, hard-cooked egg, Parm, bread crumbs and curly boquerones. This wasn’t groundbreaking — but it was well executed, flavorful and satisfying.

Latkes were spun into crunchy nests with threads of celery root, potato and onion. Peels of lush house-smoked salmon mixed with crème frâiche, celery leaf, lemon and chives sat atop each pancake. Beneath, sticky amber apple butter provided a sweet counterpoint. The same fruit butter appeared in one of the des­serts, a golden deep-fried apple pie (modeled after Mickey D’s) that Kane filled with Hon­eycrisps, Granny Smiths and Galas and topped with housemade vanilla ice cream. Flour­less chocolate cake, chocolate pudding, Or­eo crumbs, whipped cream and candied pea­­nuts layered up for a Mississippi mud in trifle form.

The hibiscus-pink Franky’s Punch was sweet enough to qualify as its own dessert, but sneaky strong with Sailor Jerry, SNAP and Drambuie dosing a vanilla/apple cider base. The cava-topped crème de violette-and-St. Germaine Viva La Diva, meanwhile, was the kind of drink you would give a mom who doesn’t drink. Mine crushed one and promptly ordered another. Beer-wise you’ve got names like Firestone Walker, Neshaminy Creek and Founders in a list of 10 taps and 28 bottles that also includes an unfortunate number of macros. Maybe it’s a tribute to the boxer that gave this address its name. I can’t imagine Frankie Bradley kicking back with a pint of St. Feuillien saison.

 

Franky Bradley’s | 320 Chancellor St., 215-735-0735, frankybradleys.com. Daily, 5 p.m.-1 a.m. (bar until 2 a.m.). Appetizers, $8-$16; sandwiches, $11-$14; entrees, $18-$29; desserts, $7.

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Franky Bradley’s breathes new life into a storied restaurant space 

SAGE cocktails mentioned on dear henry owen

SAGE cocktails mentioned on dear henry owen

03/26/2015
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Monday, March 16, 2015

Cocktail: Sage Words

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day! To celebrate my namesake holiday, I thought I would share a twist on one of my favorite cocktails, the Last Word. When Robbie and I visited Boston last summer, I had this cocktail at an amazing bar called Drink. I loved the way the botanicals in the gin worked with the herbal, floral, and honeyed taste of green chartreuse to create such a refreshing cocktail.

This beautifully green cocktail seemed like the ideal drink to distinguish yourself from the folks in shamrock shaped sunglasses. The classic recipe calls for equal parts gin, green chartreuse, maraschino liqueur, and lime juice. In this variation, we used Art in the Age’s Sage spirit; a garden gin featuring American botanicals. The Sage adds a fantastic handcrafted quality to the updated cocktail. Not only is this the perfect cocktail for Saint Patrick’s Day, it’s also a great cocktail to ring in Spring, with its vibrant herbaceousness.

Sage Words: 

1 oz Sage
1 oz Green Chartreuse
1 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
1 oz Lime Juice
Combine ingredients over ice. Shake and strain into a champagne coupe. Enjoy!

XO
Pat and Robbie

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Cocktail: Sage Words